Anthologies

The Forward Book of Poetry 2015 (Faber and Faber)

forwardbook

‘Hello My Friend’ and ‘A Mo Ina \_/ Jar’

The Forward Book of Poetry 2015, the 23rd annual anthology of the best of the year’s poetry, can be ordered here. It has a blazing yellow cover by the artist Gary Hume and includes work by all the poets shortlisted for the 2014 Forward Prizes, plus around 60 poems highly commended by the panel, who selected works from 170 poetry collections published in the previous twelve months.

 

Dear World & Everyone In It (Bloodaxe, 2013)

 

dear-world-everyone-in-it-new-poetry-in-the-uk-194x300

‘Gaddafi’, ‘Citadel’, and ‘Dusk to dust’

Dear World & Everyone In It is a ground-breaking new poetry anthology by Bloodaxe, presenting the work of over 60 of the most talented and interesting young poets currently writing in the UK. Chosen by one of the country’s leading young poetry editors, inspired by American precedents, and growing out of The Rialto’s recent series of young poets features curated by Nathan Hamilton, it is the first British anthology to attempt to define a generation through a properly representative cross-section of work and a fully collaborative editorial process.

By drawing on the poets’ own recommendations, this anthology represents more effectively and appropriately a new generational mood – hybrid, playful, collaborative, ambitious, inclusive, cooperative. Less top down, more bottom up, it speaks also of other movements in our world, and even ends up challenging parochial notions of Britishness by including overseas poets who live or work here and who have become engaged and influential in the scene.

Reviews

Editor and poet Nathan Hamilton has, with electric panache, reinvented the anthology as a form of sequencing… It is friendly to poetry’s inherent difficulties and demands. Which, to my mind, makes it the bravest anthology of poetry of the past few years.’ (David Morley, Guardian)

Dear World & Everyone In It: New Poetry in the UK edited by Nathan Hamilton (Bloodaxe) is an excellent anthology of work by 60 young poets, some already very familiar names, some less so…There is much terrific work here and, as a snapshot of young, contemporary poetry in Britain, there’s nothing better. (Adam Newey, Guardian, Best Poetry of 2013)

 

ENEMIES: The selected collaborations of SJ Fowler (Penned in the Margins, 2013)

tumblr_mtznt1Bt831qaruxco1_500

‘Panopticon’

SJ Fowler has Enemies. And the Enemies of his Enemies are his friends.

This ground-breaking, multi-disciplinary collection is the result of collaborations with over thirty artists, photographers and writers. Diary entries mingle with a partially-redacted email exchange; texts slip and fragment, finding new contexts alongside prints, paintings, diagrams, Rorschach blots, YouTube clips and behind-the-scenes photographs at the museum.

“By turns enchanting, startling, baffling, overwhelming, poignant and hugely entertaining.” The Learned Pig

Read Fowler’s introductory essay: ‘A miniaturised bulwark against being solitary’

 

Adventures in Form (Penned in the Margins, 2012)

 A Poetry Book Society Special Commendation

‘Hello My Friend’, ‘A Mo Ina \_/ Jar’, ‘Arvo Crash’ and ‘Tweet sonnet in reverse’

Click on the image to go to Penned in the Margins website. Please order from Penned in the Margins not Amazon, here is why

Welcome to a strange new world in which a poem can be written using only one vowel, processed through computer code, collaged from film trailers, compiled from Facebook status updates, hidden inside a Sudoku puzzle, and even painted on sheep to demonstrate Quantum Theory.

Discover a multitude of new and unusual poetic forms – from tweet to time-splice, and from skinny villanelle to breakbeat sonnet – in this inspiring and inventive anthology.

Adventures in Form features over ninety poems by forty-six contributors including Patience Agbabi, Christian Bök, Joe Dunthorne, Inua Ellams, Roddy Lumsden, Ian McMillan, Paul Muldoon, Ruth Padel and Hannah Silva. Edited and introduced by Tom Chivers.

 “Full of things to divert, entertain and provoke” Will Carr, The Independent 50 Best Summer Reads

All of These Things Are True and Not True (Completely Novel, 2010)
I was on the Jerwood Arvon 2009-10 mentoring scheme as a playwright, and was mentored by Colin Teevan. A digital anthology was made by If:Books, it includes an extract from my poem ‘Talking to Silence’, view it here

You can also buy an anthology of the mentees work very cheaply: All of these things are true and not true
– or read it online. It has a scene from my play, The Blok in it.

 

Stress Fractures, essays on poetry (Penned in the Margins, 2010)

 

‘Composing Speech’ : Hannah Silva on verbal music, talking backwards and the art of double-tonguing.

Stress Fractures is a genuine attempt to reach out to a different kind of readership for writing about poetry. Fourteen essays range across conventional criticism; poetics; explorations of links between poetry and popular culture; and accounts of various compositional and performance practices and strategies. […] It’s a long time since I read a book of poetry criticism that (a) showed me new ways of writing about poetry; and (b) made me want to log on to Amazon straight away and buy things I’d never heard of. David Kennedy, Stride Magazine

An exciting introduction to new directions in poetry
David Kennedy, Times Higher Education

This is a unique book brimming with some wonderful, and indeed weird, critical minds; I’ve seen nothing else quite so current and enlivening on the subject of poetry available at the moment. Charlotte Newman, Horizon Review